The Many Advantages of Wooden Balance Bikes

Teaching your kid how to ride a bike is one of the best things about being a parent isn’t it? But kids obviously have poor coordination skills and this is the reason why they have a hard time learning how to balance on a bike. This is where most people resort to training wheels. The only problem with training wheels is that it creates a false security in the mind of your child and this will make it quite difficult for them to transition from riding with training wheels to riding without them.

balance bike canada

Most parents do not realize that when they fit their children’s cycles with training wheels, they’re doing nothing but interfering with their ability to ride a regular bike. I would recommend that you get your kid started on a balance bike instead. These wooden balance bike Canada don’t have training wheels. These bikes help your child to build his/her balance & coordination skills and allow them to primarily focus on maintaining their balance. These bikes are built in a particular way which make them the perfect for children who are learning to ride bikes.

As a parent, you will not need to worry about your kid falling or losing his/her balance with these wooden balance bikes. And when your child outgrows his balance bike, he will have little or no trouble in transitioning to regular bikes without having to go through the phase where they use training wheels.

Even kids that are extremely young can ride these cycles. Even 2 year old can start learning how to balance on these bikes. This also means that your kids will be able to start riding regular bikes much faster than other kids. And since these cycles are propelled using the kid’s own muscles, it is a wonderful form of exercise as well for their legs & cardiovascular system as well.

These bikes are perfect for families with more than one kid as well. Since these bikes are wooden, you shouldn’t worry about getting different bikes for and for women. A cycle which will help your kid develop his motor skills is definitely something you would want for your kid isn’t it? And who won’t appreciate the quick learning curve of these wooden balance bikes.

If you are thinking of how you can help your kid start learning to cycle then wooden balance bikes are the perfect solution for you. So what are you waiting for? Start searching for the perfect wooden balance bike today.

“How old is your son, riding his bike?”

To us as his parents, Harley never felt like a baby for long. I know it’s a cliche but he grew up far too quickly. Mine was the baby who was off on the move with me chasing after,  while others had their babies lying beautifully on the changing mat. 



At 10 months old, Harley could walk. His little legs seemed far too tiny to be able to carry his chubby body around. This is such a special photo. His first steps caught on camera:


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For his first birthday, my lovely friend Emma bought Harley a yellow ‘Scuttlebug’. A fantastic small trike which collapses and folds up, very handy for putting in the bottom of the buggy or in the car. He absolutely loved it. 


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His ‘Aunty’ Becky then brought him a trike which grew as he grew. The trike could convert to three different stages, from being pushed by me, to removing the sides as he got bigger. And herein lies the start of his obsession with riding a bike! 


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Before he was 2, he was riding a scooter with ease, even pushing his back foot down on the brake. We had no intention whatsoever of starting Harley on a bike so young, but we were led by him. 

We were down the park one day when, on a total whim, we popped into the bike shop over the road and bought a Balance Bike. We decided to opt for a metal framed bike with proper rubber tires as opposed to a wooden framed Balance Bike. Again, Harley loved it. We started him on the small grass bank at the park. He wobbled his way down it and promptly fell off at the bottom! But he was straight up and back on it. Everyday he would ask to go on his bike. He would push off and lift his feet up and giggle every time he was on it. 


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However, he got more and more confident on his balance bike to the extent where I was actually on edge watching him because he would go so fast. He was fearless. So this was when we decided that a proper bike might actually slow him down a bit. 

We had an old Noddy bike in the garage so he had a go on that. We went down the local park again and tried him out on the path. Luke pushed him to get him started and he was off. I should mention that we never put stabilizers on his bike as he had done so well on the balance bike. We didn’t want him to become dependent on them. When we  came home from the park we videoed him. This is the very first video of him trying out a proper bike:

 

His little legs needed much more strength to keep the peddling going but he has his daddy’s determination to succeed and he just kept trying. Each time we went to the park with his bike he would tell us how far he would try to peddle. So he would try to make it to the tree, a little bit further to the bin, and further again to the gate etc. Again this was completely led by him and we went along with it.


I never imagined he would be riding a bike, unaided, at the age of 2. The number of people who would stop and watch, would make us laugh. His little head hardly fitted in his cycle helmet. He looked so out of proportion. 

As his third birthday approached, we decided to look at getting him a shiny new bike. A couple of shops looked at us like we were mad for asking for their smallest boys bike. Looking Harley up and down and saying they had nothing for someone so small. I felt quite put out. I wanted to prove to them that he could ride a bike and we weren’t completely mad parents. We took him into Halfords were they had a lovely range. He picked out a red fireman bike. Of course he picked out this one: it had an annoyingly loud siren and megaphone attached to it! It was detachable though, so all ok for us!! It was a 12″ bike and fitted him, just, with the seat at its lowest. He loved the little box on the back of the bike for him to keep bits and bobs in it. (He is currently carrying around a plastic water pistol, a whistle, and a Hot Wheels car in it!) Click here, for the link.


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My mum gave him the bike for his 3rd birthday. It was and still is, his pride and joy. He’ll grasp any opportunity to get out on his bike. At first he struggled peddling up hill but now at 3 years old, he has mastered using the brakes effectively, starting from a still position without needing a push and even jumping down the curb! Now we can all go on a family bike ride together, over the Heath. Perfect, when the weather is being kind to us!

my life. my love.

I’ve decided to write this post, as many people have stopped us in the street to talk about it, so perhaps you would like to hear about it too. 

Those of you who have read previous posts of mine will know that my 3 year old, Harley, is an outdoors boy. A stereotype, get your hands dirty, kick a football, type boy.  There are two things that I wanted to make sure he could do: Learn to swim and ride a bike. Well, he started swimming lessons this week, and the latter, he mastered when he was just 2 years old. 

To us as his parents, Harley never felt like a baby for long. I know it’s a cliche but he grew up far too quickly. Mine was the baby who was off on the move with me chasing after,  while others had their babies lying beautifully on the changing…

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Learning How to Stop

No doubt my intense ball of a boy will roll fast and straight one day. The men in my family have always known the edge of things is the most interesting–and dangerous. So before he could balance bike faster than a slow jog I taught him to roll into the grass and I’ll be damned on the hill so steep I almost made him walk, he did it.

Music for 3:58

It was the advice I never got when I first
learned to skateboard so I speed wobbled
to road rashed knees and hip bone scars
but eventually learned on the LA hills–just
go off-road and roll in the grass and rocks
No doubt my intense ball of a boy will roll
fast and straight one day. The men in my
family have always known the edge of things
is the most interesting–and dangerous. So
before he could balance bike faster than a
slow jog I taught him to roll into the grass
and I’ll be damned on the hill so steep I
almost made him walk, he did it. Please
God let the lesson of control first, then
finding the edge of losing it be what gets
wired in his taboo apple juiced neurons

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Milestones

On the plus side, it’s not long now before he’ll be joining me on proper rides, and, by the looks of it, possibly beating me to the top of climbs!

onlyindevon

So our 4 year old son has now graduated to his “big boy” Islabike from his balance bike, bypassing stabilisers completely and there’s no stopping him now. He’ll happily spend his entire time riding in circles around the street outside the house.

Despite the obvious dad pride involved in the transition, I have to admit that I’m going to miss the sight of him padding along on the bright red balance bike, legs going like the clappers and seemingly always going for the most difficult line off road.

On the plus side, it’s not long now before he’ll be joining me on proper rides, and, by the looks of it, possibly beating me to the top of climbs!

So some photos for the archive:

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